Thursday, July 8, 2010

Can a folktale go viral? The Tellery and Center for Digital Storytelling have done our second storytelling video. This is part of the Future Folklore project. The story is based on a traditional legend found in several northern countries. You can read my own version of it in Suddenly They Heard Footsteps - Storytelling for the Twenty-first Century, as part of a longer story titled The Storyteller At Fault. For our Youtube telling, the story is told in the second person present tense. Hope you enjoy it! Jennifer Lafontaine (Director of the Toronto branch of Center for Digital Storytelling) and I had fun finding the location. It's a small park north of Queen Street near Leslie. We were amazed to find the rock with the word "spirit" carved into it - very appropriate for this story.

5 comments:

Marc-André Caron said...

Great story Dan. I think I will tell it to. In French of course. I'll let you know. Take care

Lee-Ellen said...

Wonderful! The voice of second person seems like a very effective way of making an old tale feel new. I liked the tight camera work, picking up on gestures from time to time, and the immediacy of how you worked with the camera.

mia said...

Dear Dan, thanks for this welknown story,told in such a personal way. It opens my new day and a new way to tell it. I will do, in Dutch. Thanks to share your inspiration. Mia

Enrique Páez said...

Congratulations for this new video in second person. The future lies in integrating new technologies, not being an Ayatollah of oral tradition. Can we tell it in spanish? A hug from the Canary Islands.

Diane Gilliland said...

So wonderful to be reminded that when I sleep and my friends ( 2 legged and 4 ) sleep, the sleep of innocence and spirit, that we watch over each other and protect one another. That life is fragile with death often close by but it is made magical by friendships. This story landed in my heart. Hugs to you from the wild and mystical West Coast. Di